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Multnomah County Roads Capital Improvement Plan

Help Multnomah County plan the next 20 years of road improvements.

This open house is now closed, though you can learn more and provide feedback through the project website.

Project Information

Stations

Go directly to a station using the buttons below, or at the top of the screen to move through the stations in order.

1

Background

Learn about the Roads CIP and what it will do. 
2

Evaluation Criteria

The Evaluation Criteria will help the County decide which projects to build. Give us feedback about what is important to you. 
3

Project Map and List

Review and provide feedback on projects that could be included in the Plan. 
4

Priorities

Answer some questions to help the County understand your priorities. 
5

Next Steps

Learn about what will happen next and how you can be involved. Sign up for the project mailing list. 

= Page includes questions or opportunities for comment.

Background

The Roads Capital Improvement Plan (RCIP) will guide Multnomah County as it decides which roads to improve over the next 20 years.

Video: 3 min 16 sec

The plan will:

  • Help the County know how much money (capital) is needed for roads and how to get the most from it.
  • Lay out which road improvements to make, and in what order.

Why update it now?

For the first time in more than a decade, the County is digging in to understand its roads. That’s crucial because:

  • Many more people live here now than 10 or 20 years ago, and more get around without a car.
  • Landslides and floods from extreme weather affect County roads more often, especially in rural areas.
  • With better tools than ever for collecting data, we can make a truly in-depth plan.

What information goes into the plan?

Along with your input today and through the summer, the County is gathering two types of information to help shape the plan:

What's on or near a road

  • Lanes: how many and how wide
  • Shoulder type and width
  • Pavement condition
  • Posted speed limits
  • The plan will also include an inventory of: traffic signals and signs; crosswalks, sidewalks and ramps; driveways; bus stops; striping; storm pipes and culverts; guardrails; bike facilities; and on-street parking.

What happens on or near a road

  • Average daily traffic
  • Collisions and crashes
  • Soil stability and slides
  • Emergency response
  • Description of who lives and works nearby
  • Function (such as arterial, collector or local road)

Questions

Think about Multnomah County twenty years from now: What are five words that describe your vision for getting around in the area?

Evaluation Criteria

Projects need to meet what’s important to the County and its residents. The County and project team looked at the County’s core values and talked with stakeholders. That led to a list of goals to meet through the RCIP.

Six criteria

The goals became a set of six criteria. The County will use these six criteria to give a “score” to each project considered for the plan. Projects with higher scores could move forward in the plan because they meet the goals of the County and its residents. The County will plan to build projects sooner when they have a higher score.

Safety

Safety

Sample evaluation questions:

  1. Would the project address existing safety problems?
  2. How would the project affect bicycle and pedestrian safety?
  3. How would it affect emergency management?
  4. How would the project address the most frequent types of collisions?
mobility

Mobility

Sample evaluation questions:

  1. Would the project help people connect from one kind of transportation to another — and which kinds?
  2. Would it give people new routes to get where they need to go?
  3. Would it help keep people from being stuck in traffic?
  4. Would it help people get to where they work or shop, or to transport what they buy or sell?
Equity

Equity

Sample evaluation questions:

  1. Would the project help people meet economic, social, geographic and physical challenges?
  2. Would it help more people, including historically marginalized communities, use more kinds of transportation?
Sustainability

Sustainability

Sample evaluation questions:

  1. How would the project affect the environment?
  2. How does the project respond to the changing climate (floods, hotter weather events)?
  3. Would the project promote economic vitality through access to and transport of jobs/goods?
  4. Would it improve how communities would recover from a natural disaster?
Asset Management

Asset Management

Sample evaluation questions:

  1. What are the current conditions that the project would change?
  2. How long is the expected life span of what the project builds or adds?
  3. Would its benefits be worth the time, effort and money it would cost?
Cost

Cost

Sample evaluation questions:

  1. How much would the project cost to design and build?
  2. How much would it cost to maintain?
  3. Are there opportunities to combine the project with another to save money?

Questions

Should we consider these topics when selecting projects for the Plan?

Safety

(Check one.)

Mobility

(Check one.)

Equity

(Check one.)

Sustainability

(Check one.)

Asset Management

(Check one.)

Cost

(Check one.)

Are these the right criteria?

Are any criteria missing? What should we be thinking about as we finalize the list? Are there other evaluation questions we need to ask?

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Project Map and List

The plan is about improving roads with added features such as guardrails or wider shoulders. Maintaining roads, such as filling potholes, has a separate plan and separate funding.

Projects included in the RCIP could include:

  • Widening roads for more lanes (lanes to travel in, or turn lanes)
  • Widening shoulders for people walking and biking
  • Adding signals or other projects to make intersections easier and safer
  • Guardrails
  • Multi-use paths
  • Culvert replacements
  • Bridge improvements

What’s not included:

  • Maintaining roads, such as filling potholes or minor resurfacing
  • Improvements to bridges over the Willamette River (they have a separate plan)

Only County roads can be included in the plan.

County-maintained roads are found mainly in three areas:

  • Rural parts of east and west Multnomah County
  • Larger roads (called collectors and arterials) in and near Fairview, Troutdale, and Wood Village
  • Urban pockets within the County but outside cities such as Portland and Gresham

Review the proposed projects

Review the interactive map on this page. Help identify problem spots or locations with priority projects.

Comments placed by other users:

Safety issues

Traffic issues

Walking concerns

Biking concerns

Environmental concerns

Important projects

Comment Map

Below is a map of projects that could potentially be included in the RCIP. These projects have been identified as important in various local transportation system plans. We want to know what you think about these projects. Use the map commenting features to identify problem spots, give us feedback on specific projects, or provide any other comments.

INSTRUCTIONS: Click the "Add Comment" button to show options for placing a comment on the map. (At smaller screen sizes, click "Map Options" to show the comment button.) Once submitted, your comment will appear with an icon. To read other comments, just click the icons on the map. Click "Reset" to re-center the map.

Can't see the map? Click here to reload. Project descriptions and details are for planning purposes and may change based on outcomes of the RCIP process. View a PDF list of the potential projects.


Questions

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Priorities

The RCIP will include many different types of projects to make it easier for people to walk, bike, drive, and take the bus—as well as projects to improve safety and address environmental concerns. We want to know your highest priorities.

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  • Culverts

    Culverts

    Culverts help prevent flooding and improve fish and wildlife crossings.
  • Multiuse paths

    Multiuse paths

    Multiuse paths encourage active transportation (such as biking and walking).
  • Emergency access

    Emergency access

    Wider and improved roads can help ensure emergency-vehicle access
  • Growth

    Growth

    Road widenings and improvements can increase capacity for a growing population.
  • Rural character

    Rural character

    The look and feel of roads can be designed to preserve rural character.

Questions

What is most important to consider in planning and building County roads?

Prevent flooding (Check one.)
Preserving rural character (Check one.)
Encourage active transportation (such as biking and walking) (Check one.)
Make it safer to walk and bike (Check one.)
Prevent collisions that cause injury and death (Check one.)
Ensure mobility for those who don't or can't drive (Check one.)
Ensure emergency-vehicle access (Check one.)
Increase capacity for a growing population (Check one.)
Make it easier to travel through intersections (Check one.)
Add improvements for people with disabilities (Check one.)
Make sure improvements reach all communities (Check one.)
Combat climate change (Check one.)
Improve fish and wildlife crossings (Check one.)
Fix problem areas before they get worse (Check one.)
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Next Steps

Thank you for participating. Your feedback about projects and how they are evaluated will shape the updated RCIP.

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Process

Outreach phases and public role
Close
  • Process

    Process

    Outreach phases and public role

Upcoming work

Phase 1, March and April 2018: Community Values

We are here. Learn how the County decides what road projects to add, and say whether you agree. Say what road changes or new features you want, and which are most important.

  • The County will draft, then adjust what it measures and scores in considering road changes.
  • The County will draft a list of road changes to consider.

Phase 2, July and August 2018: Project List

Learn what the County wants to add or change on roads. Say what’s important to you in how the County decides.

  • The County will measure and score items on its list of what to add or change on roads.

Phase 3, November and December 2018: Final Project List

Learn which specific road projects the County wants to add to the improvement plan, and weigh how well they meet community values. Give your final comments.

  • The County will make final adjustments to its list of what to add or change on roads.

Stay Involved

  • Visit the project website at multco.us/CIPP
  • Sign up for email updates below
  • Contact Jessica Berry at Multnomah County: road_cipp@multco.us.

Tell us about you

On average, how often do you use rural County roads such as those on Sauvie Island or in the Columbia Gorge?

(Check one.)

On average, how often do you use urban County roads such as those in Troutdale, Fairview and Wood Village?

(Check one.)

How do you usually get around?

(Check one.)

How would you describe yourself

(Check all that apply.)

How did you hear about this online workshop?

(Check all that apply.)

What are the best ways to communicate with you?

(Check all that apply.)

Demographic Questions (Optional)

Your answers to these questions help us know if we are reaching a representative sample of stakeholders. They are completely optional.

How do you describe your race/ethnicity?

(Check all that apply.)

What language do you speak at home most often?

(Check all that apply.)

What is your gender?

(Check one.)

Do you rent or own your home?

(Check one.)

What is your annual household income?

(Check one.)
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